Home Security Kaspersky files case claiming software ban unconstitutional

Kaspersky files case claiming software ban unconstitutional

Kaspersky Lab has taken resort to the American legal system again, in its bid to get the ban on its products, promulgated by the Department of Homeland Security in September, rescinded.

The company filed a lawsuit in the US District Court for the District of Columbia on Monday, claiming that the ban, which was codified in the National Defence Authorisation Act for the fiscal year 2018, is unconstitutional.

In December, Kaspersky filed an appeal against the ban, to which the DHS responded, arguing that in its opinion the restriction should not be lifted.

The US ban came in the wake of allegations that Russia had interfered in the 2016 US presidential elections.

A number of mainstream  media  reports have claimed that Kaspersky was connected to Russia's spying on the US.

In the lawsuit, lawyer Ryan Fayhee and Steven Chasin said the NDAA states that "effective October 1, 2018, '[n]o department, agency, organisation, or other element of the Federal Government may use... any hardware, software, or services developed or provided, in whole or in part, by… Kaspersky Lab'."

The company said this part of the NDAA was introduced and adopted hastily in the context of mounting animosity against Russia due to the claims that it had interfered in the US presidential poll in 2016.

It claimed that, "Congress violated the foundational principle of separations of powers by circumventing the judicial process and enacting an unconstitutional bill of attainder in direct contravention of Article I, Section 9 of the US Constitution (the 'Bill of Attainder Clause' or'Clause').

"The Bill of Attainder Clause forbids Congress from enacting laws which impose individualised deprivations of life, liberty, and property and inflict punishment on individuals and corporations without a judicial trial.

"The Clause ensures that Congress accomplishes legitimate and non-punitive objectives by establishing rules of general applicability which do not specify persons to be sanctioned."

When the DHS filed its response to the Kaspersky appeal, it said that lifting the ban would not mean anything as the prohibition on Kaspersky software had now been codified in the NDAA.

By filing this lawsuit, the company seems to have decided to tackle this argument, by questioning whether the US Constitution allows Congress to pass laws based on incidents for which there is little or no evidence.

As the ban against Kaspersky is codified in sections 1634(a) and (b) and the NDAA, the company asked for these two sections to be declared unconstitutional. It also sought invalidation of these sections and any other relief deemed to be just and proper by the court.

Link to lawsuit: courtesy Cyberscoop

LEARN HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MVNO

Did you know: 1 in 10 mobile services in Australia use an MVNO, as more consumers are turning away from the big 3 providers?

The Australian mobile landscape is changing, and you can take advantage of it.

Any business can grow its brand (and revenue) by adding mobile services to their product range.

From telcos to supermarkets, see who’s found success and learn how they did it in the free report ‘Rise of the MVNOs’.

This free report shows you how to become a successful MVNO:

· Track recent MVNO market trends
· See who’s found success with mobile
· Find out the secret to how they did it
· Learn how to launch your own MVNO service

DOWNLOAD NOW!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.